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Grant County enters Phase 2 for reopening business

 

Last updated 5/27/2020 at 8:38am



Grant County was approved Saturday to move to “Phase 2” of the Washington State COVID-19 Safe Start Recovery Plan, opening many businesses and activities, with some restrictions.

Grant County commissioners had voted Friday to move to phase 2 as soon as state authorities approved the application. 

Phase 2 includes the opening of hair and nail salons, restaurants opening their dining rooms to 50% capacity, retail with restrictions, and more. 

Grant County Health District was notified May 23 that their application to move to phase two was approved by the state Department of Health.

“With Phase 2 there are many additional steps businesses will need to have in place before they are authorized to open their doors,” GCHD said in a press release. “Many local businesses have already been working on their reopening plans in anticipation of moving to the next phase.”

“While businesses and employers are doing their part to be prepared to welcome you back, it is important that our residents and visitors continue to do their part to slow the spread of COVID-19,” the health district said. “Grant County Health Officer Dr. Brzezny is urging you to wear face coverings when out in public, office spaces, or where social distancing is challenging. Wearing a face covering is protecting others from you and has proven to slow the spread of COVID-19. It’s a simple act of kindness and a responsibility we all should take seriously. All the sacrifices during the COVID-19 emergency has taken a toll on all of us, in order to stay in phase 2 it will take all of doing our part to protect each other.”

Lincoln and Spokane Counties are among other counties that have moved to phase 2. Okanogan and Douglas Counties remain at phase 1. 

Guidance during all phases of

re-opening

For high risk individuals, it continues to be important to limit travel outside of their home to reduce risk of exposure. High-risk individuals are defined as those over 65, people of all ages with pre-existing medical conditions, including those with chronic lung disease, moderate to severe asthma, serious heart conditions, those with compromised immune systems, the severely obese, diabetics, those with chronic kidney disease undergoing dialysis, and those with liver disease.

“It is important that we all take precautions until there is an effective COVID-19 vaccine or treatment,” Grant County Health District said.

 For Individuals:

Use physical distancing, staying at least six feet away from others.

When possible, wear a cloth face covering in public places.

Stay home when sick.

Avoid others who are sick.

Disinfect surfaces and objects regularly.

Cover coughs and sneezes.

Avoid touching your mouth, nose and eyes with unwashed hands.

 For Employers:

Use physical distancing of six feet between employees and patrons.

Provide services while limiting close interactions between people. 

Use barriers to block sneezes and coughs when physical distancing of six feet is not possible.

Provide ready access to handwashing facilities and hand sanitizing solutions.

Frequently clean and disinfect, especially high-touch surfaces.

Identify personal protective equipment (PPE) and use it in accordance with Labor and Industries guidance.

Educate employees on signs and symptoms of COVID-19.

Have policies and strategies in place to address employee illness.

Follow L&I guidelines.

 

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