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Animals found in tree stump

Artist completes park carvings

 

Animals found in tree stump Artist completes park carvings by Roger S. Lucas The wind-damaged trees at Mason City Memorial Park have taken on a new life — with a wildlife look — through the skills of chainsaw artist Jacob Lucas. The west-sider completed the second tree late Saturday afternoon, treated the exposed wood, and was on his way by nightfall. He uncovered a hawk, bear, coyote and giant feather in the second tree, going along with a giant Chinook salmon in an earlier tree sculpture. After a big wind storm and cleanup last July, two tree stumps, one about 10 feet tall and the other about 14 feet tall, remained. Mayor Quincy Snow, an artist himself, saw an opportunity out of the disaster, found Lucas and contracted him to do the sculptures. He cleared it with the city council, using $12,500 in hotel/motel tax money, and the project was underway. The carvings went on for several days and attracted a lot of people to watch the process. Lucas stalked the trees trying to foresee what might be inside when he applied his chainsaw to them. The Chinook salmon was an easy choice and it took shape rapidly. The second tree, a 14-foot stump, was a little different. That tree was covered with knots and it posed a peculiar problem for Lucas. When his saw started hitting the knots he got a few jolts. However, his desire to find a bear within the second tree, finally came to pass and a young cub emerged. A coyote also was revealed with a moon looking over its shoulder. One has to circle the tree stump to see all the animals and birds that were hidden inside. After completion of the work, Lucas highlighted certain areas and then sealed the sculpture. Wood sculptor Jacob Lucas works toward completion of his second tree stump carving at Mason City Memorial Park in Coulee Dam. In this tree trunk, Lucas, using his chain saw, fashioned hawks, a bear, a coyote and a giant feather. In work done a couple weeks ago on another tree, Lucas sawed out a giant fish. -- Roger S. Lucas photo

The wind-damaged trees at Mason City Memorial Park have taken on a new life — with a wildlife look — through the skills of chainsaw artist Jacob Lucas.

The west-sider completed the second tree late Saturday afternoon, treated the exposed wood, and was on his way by nightfall.

He uncovered a hawk, bear, coyote and giant feather in the second tree, going along with a giant Chinook salmon in an earlier tree sculpture.

After a big wind storm and cleanup last July, two tree stumps, one about 10 feet tall and the other about 14 feet tall, remained.

Mayor Quincy Snow, an artist himself, saw an opportunity out of the disaster, found Lucas and contracted him to do the sculptures. He cleared it with the city council, using $12,500 in hotel/motel tax money, and the project was underway.

The carvings went on for several days and attracted a lot of people to watch the process.

Lucas stalked the trees trying to foresee what might be inside when he applied his chainsaw to them.

The Chinook salmon was an easy choice and it took shape rapidly.

The second tree, a 14-foot stump, was a little different. That tree was covered with knots and it posed a peculiar problem for Lucas.

When his saw started hitting the knots he got a few jolts. However, his desire to find a bear within the second tree, finally came to pass and a young cub emerged.

A coyote also was revealed with a moon looking over its shoulder.

One has to circle the tree stump to see all the animals and birds that were hidden inside.

After completion of the work, Lucas highlighted certain areas and then sealed the sculpture.

Wood sculptor Jacob Lucas works toward completion of his second tree stump carving at Mason City Memorial Park in Coulee Dam. In this tree trunk, Lucas, using his chain saw, fashioned hawks, a bear, a coyote and a giant feather. In work done a couple weeks ago on another tree, Lucas sawed out a giant fish. -- Roger S. Lucas photo

 

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